ABOUT THE TRACK

The Forest City Velodrome went from concept to reality in just a little over four months. Late in 2004, Rob Good and Albert Coulier presented the idea of an indoor track to be built in the south end of London. In April 2005, cyclists were enjoying riding on the track. This exciting initiative brought together business, community and government partners to finance, build and run a 138-metre indoor cycling track. The Forest City Velodrome is one of only three indoor velodromes in North America.

Designed by Albert Coulier, the track is located in the former Ice House hockey arena in the south end of London. Coulier’s company, Apollo Velodrome Systems, has constructed dozens of tracks over the decades, including Olympic and world championship tracks in Montreal, Pan Am tracks in Winnipeg and other temporary tracks in arenas in Canada and the United States.

A not-for-profit organization, the Forest City Velodrome Association, operates the races, clinics and other activities at the track. Businesses and members of the public can become involved by donating to the not-for-profit corporation; becoming a partner; or volunteering time to help run learn-to-race and other development programs.

From the beginner to the elite level, track cycling offers thrills and excitement for both athletes and spectators alike. Development programs are offered to bring new, young Canadian talent into the sport, while elite athletes can train indoors during the winter to prepare for an international competitive schedule that culminates in the World Championships in February of each year. The FCV offers various races and other programs for riders of all abilities.

Spectators are treated to a venue where each seat providing a close-up view of a wide variety of races that can easily reach speeds in excess of 60 kilometres per hour. Check out the race schedule to find out more about racing at the FCV.

The Forest City Velodrome is a not for profit corporation that runs on volunteers staff. The track was built by volunteers and continues to be maintained by volunteers over the years.

Training

FCV is open year round for riding and training sessions typically run through fall to early spring. Riding fixed gear develops leg speed and strength, and riding with others on the track develops quick reactions, powerful acceleration, and quick recovery time. Training sessions focus on drills to improve rider strength, speed, fitness, as well as tactics and bike handling skills. Whether you want to improve your sprint or your endurance, shorten your recovery time or develop quick reactions to attacks, learn to spin while out of the saddle or get comfortable working in close quarters in mass start races, the track is the place to go.

  • Why do I ride at the Velodrome? It's an exceptionally unique track upon which I've developed my track cycling skills and techniques, ride with a really great group of people and above all, have a lot of fun! As a 58-year- old woman, I did the Track 1 training more out of curiosity, never thinking this would be for me. I loved the speed and powering through the corners. The results have translated into improved road cycling skills, faster pace and greater fitness. The Velodrome is a welcoming place for all cyclists. If I can do it, so can you!"
    Sue Silcox
  • As a recreational rider, the Velodrome kept me in shape throughout the winter. In fact, riding a single speed bike has greatly improved my hill climbing during outdoor road riding.
    Bryan White
  • FCV has been such a great find, not only to give B a place to be athletic and active during the winter months, but it has strengthened an already existing interest in cycling and introduced a new stream-track! The Velo-Kids program is fantastic-the coaches are amazing with the kids!  So many people don’t know about FCV, and they should check it out!  From the exciting race nights, to the many “learn to” programs, FCV is an amazing place we have.  I’d tell anyone who hasn’t been there to go!
    Sarah
  • The velodrome is a great place to socialize. Sometimes I'll spend 2 hours talking to people and only ride for 15 minutes. As long as my wife doesn't check Strava, she thinks I'm exercising.
    Tony Fangeat